IMPRESSIVE PRESS

Netflix trailer for 'Vampires vs. the Bronx' looks like hectic fun with a social conscience

BY SAM HAYSOM

           Vampires vs. the Bronx is on its way to Netflix, and it looks every bit as fun as the title suggests.

           With strong echoes of Attack the Block and Get Out, Osmany Rodriguez's film mixes horror with social commentary as local kids are forced to defend their neighborhood in the Bronx from invading vampires and gentrification.

           "You all know how this starts," says one of the main characters, shortly after they've seen that the local courthouse is being changed into a modern apartment block.          "White people with canvas bags? That's always the first sign."

            Soon after the vampires (who are also real estate workers) have arrived, and the kids are grabbing any weapons they can — and enlisting the help of The Kid Mero, who stars fittingly in the movie as a Bodega owner — to wage war against the monsters.

            "We are going to wipe you out like the vermin you are," says a vampire at one point in the trailer.

           But it looks like they may have bitten off more than they can chew.

Vampires vs. the Bronx drops on Netflix Oct. 2.

Annette E. Alvarez, a talent manager in New York City, held video meetings with her actors, most of whom are nonwhite. Credit: Robert Stolarik for The New York Times

Fighting to Give Minority Actors the Spotlight

By Rebecca White

March 13, 2016 

   

The cabdriver. The petty thief. The nanny. The friend.

The smaller, less glamorous parts on television and in film are usually available to all actors. But the bigger roles, the star spots, often elude minority actors. Annette E. Alvarez, a talent manager in New York City, has been trying to change that, pushing for a broader range of roles for minority actors since 1994.

Annette E. Alvarez, a talent manager in New York City, held video meetings with her actors, most of whom are nonwhite. Credit: Robert Stolarik for The New York Times

MULTICULTURAL ENTREPRENEURS

Monday, May 19, 2008

Tell us about three entrepreneurs that you admire?


When I was younger I read all the business books, etc. However, at the end of my day it's my parents who I admire most - they were my Wharton. And from what I just found out, my mother as a kid loved to work at her dad's "bodega" in Cuba. My father -- when he wasn't at the factory, he was selling jewelry or electronics. I'm a first generation Cuban-American. My parents came to this country in the early 50s, and shortly after I was born in '58, the goal was set: to move from Brooklyn to Miami and open a factory. And they did. Basically, they taught me the value of effort and hardwork.

Annette E Alvarez Owner of Multi-Ethnic Talent & Promotion, Inc. and Tostobueno, with DonClark Williams, owner & creator of Tostobueno, The Ultimate Tostonera.